Orange Juice — The Silent Tooth Killer?

New research shows orange juice rapdily erodes teeth
New research shows orange juice rapidly erodes teeth

New research shows orange juice rapidly erodes teeth

Orange Juice. It’s been a classic, refreshing breakfast sidekick for generations. It’s loaded with Vitamin C and nothing tastes so good fresh out of the juicer. But what if every sip actually did more harm than good?

According to Dr Yan-Fang Ren, of the Eastman Institute for Oral Health, the acid in orange juice “is so strong that the tooth is literally washed away.”

Using a revolutionary vertical scanning microscope for the first time, researchers were able to see the extensive surface detail on teeth, revealing massive erosion of the enamel caused by drinking highly acidic juices, such as orange juice.

But that’s not all. The unnatural acceleration of erosion of the teeth caused by acidic juices can substantially increase your risk of developing tooth decay.

So orange juice — the breakfast staple most of us have enjoyed for years — may not be the “wholesome goodness” our parents told us about. Does this mean you shouldn’t drink it? If you value your dental health, you should definitely think twice before downing that glass of OJ with your scrambled eggs.

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Comments

  1. Jerry DuBoise Says: January 31, 2018 at 5:55 pm

    I have a abssesed tooth can I not drink OJ then???!!

  2. Rainbow Dash Says: January 29, 2013 at 5:14 pm

    jojo is right you`re not suppose tho brush your teeth right after orange juice

  3. Rainbow Dash Says: January 29, 2013 at 5:14 pm

    jojo is right you`re not suppose tho brush your teeth right after orange juice

  4. I’ve heard it’s also recommended that you DO NOT brush your teeth immediately after consuming fruits (most fruits are acidic). You’re supposed to wait an hour after brushing, because that’s how long it takes the enamel to remineralize or something. If you brush immediately after consuming, say, pineapple or citrus, you risk permanently brushing away temporarily weakened enamel.

  5. HEY why arent the dentist telling us this cause nobody told me OJ was bad for us i mean i love my pretty smile and i dont want to lose it over something that we drink me every morning to get a fresh start i mean, not trying to debate but cmon! its crazy man i drink it andn i brush my teeth after but people with tooth decay i have friends with it they said they brushed their teeth everyday after they ate or drink this does that mean im in danger of TOOTH DECAY!!!!??

  6. Lani Calvert Says: November 16, 2009 at 1:03 pm

    What about other acidic fruit juices: lemon, grapefruit, etc. and Apple Cider Vinegar? They all are touted for their health benefits, especially ACV and I think it’s probably more acidic than OJ.

    • Hi Lani,

      Basically anything with a high acidity can cause serious damage to your teeth. That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t consume it, it just means you need to be careful to clean your teeth after you eat or drink highly acidic foods (like citrus juices and vinegars). One of the best things you can do is to rinse with and drink a high pH water. I recommend Essentia Water (you can check out my review here: Essentia Water Review).

      Thanks! And enjoy those acidic foods and beverages, but always in moderation and with some care for your teeth and body!
      Dr. Marvin

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