Dangers in Dentistry — The Dangers of Dental Cavitations

Episode 11 of Dangers in Dentistry, originally aired on KPRZ in San Diego.

Has your dentist ever talked to you about cavitations? I’m not talking about cavities, but cavitations. Chances are, if you’re like most people (including most dentists), you’ve never even heard the term, let alone had a conversation with your dentist about the dangers of cavitations.

The truth is, there are several health problems that are linked to cavitations, but most dentists either don’t know what they are or don’t know the proper way to identify and treat them.

In this week’s episode of Dangers in Dentistry, Dr. Marvin — America’s Holistic Dentist — talks about dental cavitations, the symptoms of cavitations, identifying cavitations, and treatments for dental cavitations.

Join us for this week’s episode of Dangers in Dentistry and discover the truth behind these myths!

Enjoy!
Dr. Marvin
San Diego, Encinitas Holistic Dentist

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Comments

  1. elba martinez Says: August 16, 2011 at 2:30 pm

    i had breast cancer twice since 2007. i have lost two of my teeth in the back of my mouth. i now need fillings. the dentist wants to put in new plastic fillings which i know might be
    harmful to me because of my history with cancer . is it safe to have plastic fillings?
    he says it’s safe but i read a lot about toxins and i am worried that the
    plastic will do some harm. what should i do about the fillings.

    thank you

    • As an old dental mentor always said, “It Depends”

      The short answer is, get tested for fillings.

      I just had a patient yesterday that was sensitive to the plastic fillings that were just placed in her mouth. She’s also sensitive to the white crowns (PFM porcelain fused to metal crowns) that were placed just 2 years ago.

      And most of her gold restorations were good with her, except 2. The gold fillings looked the same but were made by different dental labs and different dentists. So you never know.

      So, please get tested on the materials before you invest your hard earned money.

      Dr. Marvin

  2. I had a BAD case of vertigo last August,that kept me in bed with eyes closed for two days, just to cope. After a few weeks my brain worked out how to deal with — but I have had lingering “issues” (occasional balance issues, slower brain processing) ever since.

    I just learned about cavitations from a friend of mine, and wondered if this could be a factor in my vertigo — I had had a right upper molar removed about 4 months prior to the vertigo. And my nystagmus was too the right….

    Have others had vertigo as their only symptom from cavitations?

    • Hi Jo, your question is a tricky one. It’s hard to pinpoint any specific symptom to a hole on your jaw. That being said, it may or may not help clear up your vertigo if you have those holes repaired.

      Wish I had more absolutes for you, but that’s a tough one.
      Dr. Marvin

  3. I had teeth pulled 3 months ago I belive this cavitation is what I have, I am sick as a dog, I have the bitter sour taste which gags me and the posion coming from the gum tissues make me sick and I get dizzy. They put me on antibotics and it calms down, when off the antibotic after 5 days it starts all over again! I feel pressure up in the upper right side of my jaw where teeth were pulled back in dec. this is now april. They have called me crazy or that i was making up my sickness cause the cat scan and the panaramoic xray shows nothing! I have been passed to my family doctor which says its not medical and told top go to oral surgeon. Been there done that and was also told nothing was wrong and refused to cut me open to even take a look and mean while I have to live on antibotics and I have been to the top oral surgeons in this town and I am getting now where. I need help.

    • Gabby, you need to see someone who can diagnose a cavitation to see if that is the root cause. Good holistic dentists and surgeons should be able to read a CT scan of your jaw and tell you if you have a cavitation.

      It’s frustrating when you know you’re sick but you don’t know why. Could it be a cavitation? It could be, but it could also be something else. The best thing I can recommend is that you see someone who will listen to you and help you find the root cause.

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